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LOCUST, BLACK

Robina pseudoacacia


Robina pseudoacacia of the family Fabacea, the pea family. A very hard, durable wood. Another "locust" wood, honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos, also of the family Fabacea), has its own page on this web site. Although the two woods can sometimes be hard to distinguish, generally speaking black locust is yellowish/greenish and honey locust has a pink or orange tint, not yellow or green.

Also called "robina" (from the genus), "false acacia" (from the specific epithet) and "white acacia", "White" locust", and "yellow locust", and just "locust"

Black locust is one of those species that have large early growth pores that are just packed with tylosis (even more than white oak). This is easily visible in the end grain updates in my own samples below where the pores appear to be clogged with sanding dust but are actually full of tyloses.



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of black locust / Robina pseudoacacia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of black locust / Robina pseudoacacia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank from a black locust root / Robinia pseudoacacia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This piece was amazingly light, and the vendor, Mark Peet, tells me that the lightness is typical of black locust root wood. The reason for it in this piece is pretty clear --- normal black locust is ring porous but with the large earlywood pores on at the beginning of the earlywood and then there's usually a lot of wood until the next row of earlywood pores. In this piece, you can see that the large pores are present everywhere except right up near the pith, which makes for a lot of holes in the wood, thus the lightness.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above



both sides and both ends of a black locust sample piece


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


black locust sample plank and end grain


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a black locust sample plank


end grain and end grain closeup of the sample plank directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


black locust plank and end grain. This plank was donated to the site by Ira Matheny, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above --- the color is a little more washed out than is actually the case in the wood.


black locust planks and a closeup --- the color of the wood is slightly more yellow and less orange than this pic shows, and the wood has just a hint of green tint as well. The pics directly below of a smaller piece, cut from this one, are much more accurate.


small plank, cut from the larger on above and sanded for the pic, and an end grain shot. The colors are very accurate.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


black locust planks


black locust planks and a closeup


I had read that black locust is one of those woods that flouresces under black light, so I tried it out and boy howdy, it sure does.


The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, also listed as yellow locust, and just "locust") from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views



web pics:


log ends --- note that the middle one is freshly cut (thus the yellowish color) and the one on the right is well seasoned (thus the orangish color)


slab


plank listed as black locust / Robinia pseudocacia and with wet and dry sections


flat cut and quartersawn planks of "robin" which is another common name for black locust


flat cut plank listed as "white" locust (just another name for the same species as the common name "black" locust)


flat cut black locust planks


quartersawn black locust planks


planks all from the same vendor


planks listed as black locust / Robinia pseudacacia


plank listed as robinia / Robinia pseudoacacia


end grain


black locust turning stock


black locust turning stock listed as unseasoned


three views of a freshly sawn black locust plank, submitted by a correspondent named Jeff, whom I thank. Both levels of enlargement are present for all 3 pics, and on the last one the enlargements clearly show some ray flakes. Jeff tells me the color is accurate, which is a little weird since I thought that normally black locust is yellowish when freshly cut and turns more orange/brownish with age.


black locust scales



curly scales with the bottom 3 showing some nice ray flakes in addition to the curl.


very flaky quartersawn scales


listed as black locust veneer but looks to me exactly like red elm


black locust bowl blanks


black locust bowl blanks that have been waxed


waxed bowl blank --- might just be the wax or an interesting color variation, but this looks to me more like honey locust than black locust


bowl blanks


black locust turning square and end grain


black locust bottle stopper blanks (these are actually quite small)


black locust pen blanks that have been moistened


black locust burl scales


both sides of a set of turning blocks listed as Robina pseudoacacia burl


black locust burls


burl cap and the opened side


veneer --- not sure if this is flat cut or rotary cut


listed as "steamed" veneer, obviously flat cut


wormy black locust turned to a toadstool (decorative object)


black locust burl vase


vessel


black locust bowls


black locust bowls turned and photographed by Tom Pleatman, whom I thank for these pics and other contributions to the site. Big enlargements are present.