WOOD ID POSTER:
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240 woods on a poster (24"x36")


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SUMAC

Rhus spp.


Rhus spp. of the family Anacardiaceae. There are at least 2 dozen species in the genus Rhus that have among them many dozens of names that are some variation of sumac (or sumach). The one that I have seen more prevalent in American woodworking is staghorn sumac (R. typhina and possibly a couple of others) and I have broken it out to its own page on this site



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of shining sumac / Rhus copallian --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of sugar sumac / Rhus ovata --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. I see I messed up the focus on the labled side, but the samples already back with David, so messed up it will stay.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a rough plank contributed to the site by Milton Smith who cut it in Wisconsin and whom I thank for the contribution. Milton believes, based on the color, that this is smoothbark sumac.

NOTE: all of these pics of the smoothbark sumac are just a shade too orange and not quite green enough and I can't see any difference between this and some staghorn sumac I've seen (but that doesn't mean it is NOT smoothbark sumac)


both sides, sanded smooth, of the two small planks I recovered from the rough plank directly above


end grain of the 2 planks directly above


end grain closeups of the two planks directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above

NOTE: the pics of the following two planks of African sumac were submitted by Jon Dake, whom I thank most kindly for the contribution. Jon tells me these are freshly cut (unseasoned) from a tree in Arizona but which is not native to Arizona (Hey ... it doesn't LOOK like a cactus, does it)


both sides of a plank of African sumac and a closeup


both sides of another plank of African sumac


The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
laurel sumac (R. laurina) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
poison sumac (R. vernix) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
dwarf sumac (R. copallina) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views



web pics:


plank listed as African sumac / Rhus lancea


plank listed as dwarf sumac / Rhus capallinum


plank listed as Hawaiian sumac / rhus sandwicensis


plank listed as flowering sumac / Rhus hypoleuca


plank listed as laurel sumac / Rhus laurina


plank listed as mountain sumac / Rhus trichorcarpa


mountain sumac (Rhus trichocarpa) pic submitted by Bill Mudry --- thanks Bill


plank listed as poison sumac / Rhus javanica (NOTE: poison sumac is normally Rhus toxicodendron and Rhus javanica is normally called Japanese poison sumac)


plank listed as sugar sumac / Rhus ovata


plank listed as Tahitian sumac / Rhus taitensis


plank listed as winged sumac / Rhus copallinum


planks just listed as sumac


sumac log


African sumac knife handle by Frank Ogle.



NOTE: all of the pics below were provided by Milton Schmit, who also provided the sample plank shown up above. This is all from the same tree, which Milton believes to be smoothbark sumac. I cannot vouch for the colors on any of these pics, but the pieces all came from the same tree as the sample plank shown above, so that should give you some idea. It is a very colorful piece, so the vibrant colors below are believable. Some of the color variation is likely due to the fact that Milton used various finishes on the different pieces.


two views of a bowl finished with water based varnish.


bowl and pepper shaker both finished with Danish oil


two bowls made from the root of the tree and finished with Danish oil


various objects made by Milton Schmit --- the enlargements really show the grain patterns well





smoothbark sumac bowls


vase just listed as sumac


bowls listed as African sumac


this bowl was turned by Barry Richardson whom I thank for this pic and other contributions to the site. This is a terrific example of how ultraviolet changes some wood. The piece in the middle is a freshly cut piece of African sumac and the bowl is the same wood but aged for several years. It does not have any dye or stain that causes the color change, it's just the UV exposure. I note that the raw wood is exactly the same color as that in the pics near the top of this page that were given to me by Jon Drake.


three views of a hollow form listed as African sumac harvested in Arizona