WOOD ID POSTER:
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240 woods on a poster (24"x36")


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PERSIMMON

Diospyros spp.




click here for a discussion of the genus Diospyros
Diospyros spp. of the family Ebenaceae

The unique thing about this wood is that it has a VERY small heart area that is deep brown or black, which makes it clear why this is in the ebony family. The wood is generally only available as sapwood, which is creamy white, sometimes mottled with gray, and very hard and tough and resistant to wear but with a large movement in service. Used for golf club heads because of extremely high shock resistance.



my samples:



both sides and both ends of a sample --- this is an EXCELLENT sample, showing as it does the very small "ebony" heart


end grain closeup from the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Texas persimmon / Diospyros texana --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of persimmon / Diospyros virginiana --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The labeled side is raw but the 2nd side has been sanded down to 240 grit and thus looks a bit richer in color and shows the face grain details a bit better.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of common persimmon / Diospyros virginiana


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


sample plank listed as persimmon / Diospyros virginiana, and end grain --- this is totally unlike my other samples of that species and also totally unlike any description I've ever seen of persimmon, so I'm not at all convinced that it IS persimmon. The end grain closeup below, other than the color difference, DOES look like my other samples, so perhaps this is persimmon. Also, it DOES somewhat resemble some of the web pics below. This NOT being representative of a species is fairly typical of the samples I got from the IWCS, but for this particular wood, I am inclined to think that it IS to some extent because of the wood --- when persimmon is not cut and dried just right, it DOES end up looking bad, although generally it's a lighter gray as you can see from my sample below, and not the brown of this sample plank.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Chinese persimmon / Diospyros kaki --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. I note that in French Canada, where this was labled, it seems to go by a common name that is just the specific epithet --- It also uses that name in Japan


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of myrtle ebony / Diospyros pentamera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This is an Australian member of the ebony family. One of its common names is "Australian persimmon" and another is "gray persimmon".


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


this is the dealer's pic of a log section I bought, not fully dried. After a year or two (I forget, actually) of air drying, I split it up and made little planks to use in by bowls, but I am VERY disappointed in the color, which is almost uniformly gray, not even close to white. All of the pieces below are from this small log. There were a lot of worm-holes but I mostly put those on the down side so they don't show up in the pics. The whitish color of the log is accurate --- the gray seems to have crept in over time, and my understanding is that that is common for persimmon.


these pieces are the two sides split directly off the center, showing the classic tiny "ebony" center that is common to persimmon.


various pics, including end grain closeups, of the bunch of small planks I made from the split up log section --- as you can see, there is very little white, just about all gray. Nice grain pattern, but unattractive color.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of one of those pieces directly above




All of the pics in this section are of a bunch of samples provided by James Caraway,
whom I thank for the contribution to the site.



Here's a pic of the batch of logs that these were cut from. Because these pieces were all cut at the "wrong" time of year and were not subjected to a tightly controlled kiln drying schedule they developed the pretty much ineviable gray color that I also experienced on my other set of samples above. The pieces that show as fairly bright yellow have some kind of patina on them, or perhaps it's due to a protective coating that James put on them. I forgot to ask. Almost all of the pieces he sent started out this color but as you can see, it sands right off.


three views of a little piece from the middle of one of the logs, showing the ebony heartwood.


small bowl blank and end grain shot


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


although this is a face grain closeup and and side grain closeup of the piece directly above, both are rift cut sections so there's very little difference.


small plank, fairly well sanded, and end grain shot


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


face grain closeup and side grain closeup of the piece directly above --- both are rift cut but the side grain is closer to quartersawn than the face grain.


small plank, fairly well sanded, and end grain shot


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


face grain (flat cut) closeup and side grain (quartersawn) closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a couple of other sample pieces. Note that on the bottom one I only sanded down one side so the other still shows the yellow patina (or whatever it is). The discoloration on the upper piece is white rot spalting.


both sides of a piece cut from the upper one of the piece above --- HUGE enlargements are present. The yellow areas are white rot spalting. My color correction added a slight orange tinge to the wood. It should be the same gray color as in the pics of the larger piece above.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


the rest of the pieces James put in the box. Notice that I only sanded some of them; the top two still have the yellow patina. Some of these show small areas of the ebony heartwood.

end of the section on pieces contributed by James Caraway



The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
persimmon (D. virginiana) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views


web pics:


plank --- color is too orange


plank with bark --- color is likely quite accurate


plank listed as persimmon / Diospyros blancoi


planks with accurate color --- the warping on that last one is typical of this wood


planks with no heartwood


planks with colors that I'm doubtful about


plank from a reasonably reliable source but with a color that I find unconvincing. This source had some other woods shown with more red than they should have shown and I believe that has to be the case here.


listed as persimmon plank, but I don't believe that for a minute. Looks a lot more like pine, but whatever it is, it is not persimmon.


plank listed as D. kaki (Japanese persimmon)


these planks were listed as persimmon, but I'm not convinced that that's what they are --- everything about them seems wrong for persimmon: the color, the open-pore graininess, and the change in color from light brown to brown to dark brown all look wrong. This looks much more like limba to me.


both sides and a closeup of a crotch slab with some wetting for the pic


veneer --- it seems unlikely to me that all of these colors can be correct


"wormy" persimmon


log sections with colors that I find quite good except for the bright yellow which I'm doubtful about.


end grain cutting board making interesting use of the ebony-colored heartwood


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