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NARRA

Pterocarpus indicus

NOTES:



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of narra --- HUGE enlargements are present. This little piece was on the mystery wood page for a long time as Mystery wood 174 because I mistakenly though that the bogus "narra" shown at the bottom of this page was what narra really looked like and that this piece shown here was something else. My recent forray into fine sanding end grains, along with having obtained several other sample of narra, showed me clearly that this IS narra and the wood at the bottom of the page is not.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


sample piece and end grain --- colors are a bit too rich in these two pics


end grain closeup of the sample piece directly above.


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of mottled narra / Pterocarpus indicus --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The vendor has this as "bee's wing" figure but I think that's overly optimistic; it's really just mottled. ALSO, he has the specific epithet wrong. It should be indicus (as I've spelled it above) not indica as he has it on the label. The labled side is raw but the 2nd side has been sanded to 240 grit and so shows details better.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of New Guinea padauk / Pterocarpus indicus --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The vendor, who is pretty sloppy with names, was the specific epithet wrong. It should be indicus (as I have listed it above), not indica as he has it on the label. The labled side is raw but the 2nd side has been sanded to 240 grit and so shows details better and is a slightly lighter color.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


a couple of turning sticks of red narra


end grains and an end grain closeup of the pieces directly above. The end grain closeup shows considerable scratch marks from my less-than-fine sanding.


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


turning block. When I got this, the ends were sealed and when I sanded off the sealant, there were no apparent cracks in the end grain. After less than a day later, the obvious cracks had developed, which is a sure sign of poor or incomplete drying.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above

NOT a raw wood color
sample plank, with a finishing agent, shot in a woodworking store. HUGE enlargements are present. The color of the wood is what you see in the pic but I have no explanation for WHY it's that color and it seems very unlikely to me that this is the same wood as the rest of what's shown on this page. The people in the wood store have a vague knowledge that woods HAVE "botanical names" but they have no idea what they are.


veneer listed as "Papua New Guinea rosewood" --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sheet was contributed to the site by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


red narra veneer



web pics:


cross section of a log


planks


plank listed as yellow narra / Pterocarpus indicus and another just listed as yellow narra


figured plank and closeup


a set of planks and some closeups --- note that some areas were moistened to show the grain better


planks from one of those vendors who just can't resist "correcting" the color until it looks nothing like the wood --- these pieces in reality probably look much like my own sample at the top of this page.


planks from the BogusColorVendor so they almost certainly have too much red in the pics


figured planks


curly plank


curly plank listed as "tiger stripe" narra / Pterocarpus indicus


three pieces all listed as bee's wing narra / Pterocarpus indicus. I think the bee's wing designation is a stretch for the first one and more of a stretch for the last one and just silly for the one in the middle.


both sides of a plank --- this wasn't even listed as figured, although it obviously is



both sides of a plank and two closeups --- these weren't even listed as figured, although they obviously are


both sides of a pair of planks --- these weren't even listed as figured, although they obviously are


turning stick


turned sphere


pen blanks


veneer


veneer listed as narra / Pterocarpus indicua


veneer, all from the same vendor. It was not specified as "red" narra, but certainly seems to be that variety.


red narra veneer closeups that all have both levels of enlargement


listed as bee's wing veneer, this is a very light figure and to my mind much too weak to be legitimately called bee's wing


"red narra" turning stock --- I have no idea how correct the red color is as I have only seen red narra in veneer form and it is more red and less orange than these (these are all from the same vendor)


figured red narra turning stock


red narra from a different vendor than the ones directly above


red narra planks


curly red narra turning stock


both sides of a curly red narra plank


curly red narra pen blanks --- the purple color of the first two sets is likely just poor photography


scales just listed as narra, but they certainly appear to be red narra


red narra bowl blank from yet another vendor


crotch veneer





pen barrels listed as curly red narra. I'm not positive but I think the bright red color on the first one is likely an exaggeration.


red narra bowl and regular narra bowl and an urn of curly narra with an African blackwood finial





I DON'T KNOW WHAT THIS WOOD IS
I bought this wood in the mid-1990's from a nornally reliable source, "Curious Hardwoods", the exotic woods division of Curtis Lumber in New York. It did not look like narra to me but I was assured not only that it was narra but that it was specifically Pterocarpus indicus and for a long time, I thought THIS was the correct narra and that a wood I had bought on eBay as narra was in fact something else. I clearly had too much faith in Curtis Lumber. This wood is most emphatically not Pterocarpus indicus and in fact, based on the fine-grain detail shown in the end grain, I would be seriously surprized if it turned out to be ANY Pterocarpus species. I have no idea what it actually is.


both sides of a plank with spalted sapwood


closeups of both sides of spalted sapwood


plank and end grain. This was cut from the larger piece directly above and shows heavy blue stain.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


plank chosen for semi-crotch area


two closeups of the plank directly above


small plank cut from the larger one directly above and sanded


end grain and end grain closeup of the small plank directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a small plank that is mostly sapwood (cut from the large plank a little way above here).


end grain and end grain closeup of the spalted sapwood piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above

end of the "I DON'T KNOW WHAT THIS WOOD IS" section