WOOD ID POSTER:
co-created by, and sponsored by, HobbitHouse


240 woods on a poster (24"x36")


www.woodposter.com

open main page here



HACKBERRY

Celtis spp.


Hobbit note: When I first saw hackberry it was in veneer form and I was absolutely convinced that it was American white ash that had been mislabelled. Since then I've observed that although the face grain is VERY similar to white ash, the end grain is unmistakably different.



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of hackberry / Celtis occidentalis --- HUGE enlargements are present


end gain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of hackberry / Celtis occidentalis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. When I first looked at this sample, I thought the dark area was blue stain, but after looking at other pics of hackberry, I realized that it really is heartwood


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of hackberry / Celtis occidentalis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of dwarf hackberry / Celtis tenufolia --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of dwarf hackberry / Celtis tenufolia) --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of dwarf hackberry / Celtis tenufolia) --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of netleaf hackberry / Celtis reticulata --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above



both sides and both ends of a sample piece which, by the way, does not look at all like my other sample directly below, but it does look somewhat like some of the web pics I've collected.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above --- color should be more white, not green


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


small plank and end grain --- contributed by Chris Arvidson, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above --- the color of the closeup should be more white but the update IS somewhat yellow as shown


plank and end grain. This was sent to me by Neil Scheidt for identification and I told him I thought it might be sen. He subsequently told me it had been identified by the USDA wood lab as hackberry,


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


plank and end grain --- this was sent to me by Neil Scheidt for ID but he figured out it was hackberry before it even arrived on my doorstep.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of spalted hackberry / Celtis occidentalis --- HUGE enlargements are present



end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of spalted hackberry / Celtis occidentalis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of spalted hackberry / Celtis occidentalis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a really nicely spalted hackberry plank


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


veneer --- looks exactly like American white ash


The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
Mississippi hackberry (Celtis mississippiensis, also listed as sugarberry) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views. Celtis mississippiensis is a synonym for Celtis occidentalis


web pics:


flat cut, quartersawn, and end grain


two views of a log section


raw planks


planks


planks listed as hackberry / Celtis occidentalis


planks listed as European hackberry / Celtis australis


planks listed as "Oklahoma" hackberry


both sides and a closeup of a set of planks


crotch


turning stock


pen blanks


veneer


veneer that was listed as EITHER hackberry veneer OR sugarberry veneer (as I have commented, they can be impossible to tell apart)



the following veneer sheets were all identified specifically as Celtis occisentalis


Celtis occisentalis veneer





spalted planks


spalted planks and closeup


spalted planks and three closeups


spalted turning block, waxed


spalted cant on the mill and a closeup of a slab milled from it


spalted bowl blanks


spalted pen blanks


spalted turning stock


spalted turning stock end grain


spalted bowls --- the unusually rich orange color on the last one is unlikely as a raw wood color; it might have been enhanced by a finishing agent or by the photography; the middle one has a void that is more clear in the enlargement. Note how little spalting there is in the first one, but what clear black-line spalting it is.


two views of a spalted bowl


both sides of a spalted bowl and then another spalted bowl, all by Bryan Nelson (NelsonWood)


spalted platter


urn and bowls, both made from spalted hackberry. The orange color is unlikely


spalted hackberry turned box


vase --- not listed as spalted, but it clearly is


bowl


bowls --- although the color on these seems reasonable, it is undoubtedly enhanced by a finishing agent, as the raw wood is not likely to be this rich and shiny


hackberry bowls turned and photographed by Tom Pleatman, whom I thank for these pics and other contributions to the site. Big enlargements are present.