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APPLE

Malus spp. and Pyrus spp.

Malus spp. and Pyrus spp. both of the family Rosaceae. There are at least two dozen Malus species and a dozen Pyrus species that have apple as all or part of one or more of their common names. In addition, there are almost another 200 species from another 60 genera that also have apple as all or part of one or more of their common names.

my samples:
NOTE: these pics were all taken in very bright incandescent lighting ("soft white" at 2700K)
colors will vary under other lighting conditions


both sides of a sample plank of apple / Malus domestica --- HUGE enlargements are present


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of apple / Malus domestica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of apple / Malus domestica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of common apple / Malus sylvestris --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The dark streaking is likely mineral stain, although with the white inside it, it could be a combination of blue stain / white rot


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of apple listed as Northern spy apple / Malus sylvestris --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above



both sides and both ends of a sample piece


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of apple harvested in Washington state


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of flowering crab apple / Malus spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both side of a sample plank of Oregon crab apple / Malus spp. --- I believed the light areas to be wormholes but had stated that they could could be just rot; correspondent Mark Freeland tells me they are definitely wormholes and he has experienced many similar looking pieces.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Oregon crab apple / Malus fusca --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Oregon crab apple / Malus fusca --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Oregon crab apple / Malus fusca --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Japanese crab apple / Malus floribunda --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


set of planks


closeup from the set directly above


set of planks


closeup from the set directly above


plank and end grain --- this was cut from the larger plank above


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


plank --- it's unseasoned so I'll stick it in the garage for a couple of years and then clean the ends and get and end grain shot. EDIT: now done: see directly below. I assume the lightening of the color in the newer pics is because it now has relatively little moisture.


both sides of a sample plank of apple. HUGE enlargements are present. This has been air drying in my garage for a couple of years and I can't even remember where I got it, but it was identified only as "apple", not any particular species or even type of apple.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


first face and the end grain of a sample of apple / Malus spp. This part of a collection which is discussed here: COLLECTION B


the second face, before and after slicing off 1/8" showing how the patina from aging is only surface deep.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above.


first face and the end grain of a sample of apple / Malus spp. This part of a collection which is discussed here: COLLECTION B. This is most likely Malus domestica.


the second face, before and after slicing off 1/8" showing how the patina from aging is only surface deep.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above.


apple box shot at a woodworking show --- HUGE enlargements are present


stairway made from apple wood ... pic donated by Iain Rankin, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
apple (Pyrus malus) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
crab apple (Pyrus rivularis, aka Oregon crab apple) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for all 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
wild crab apple (Pyrus Coronaria, which is just a syn. for Malus coronaria) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views. This wood is also listed as wild crab and sweet-scented crab; why these are not "crab apple" instead of just "crab" I do not know but apparently that IS another common name for this wood.

web pics:


end grain listed as Malus communis


log ends


various log sections with believable colors


log section with unnaturally strong red color --- might have just been moistened for the pic


planks (I believe the deep orange ones have been moistened for the pics)


both sides of a pair of planks


scales


apple scales with white rot, moistened for the pics


pieces with white rot


spalted pieces --- this is black line spalting is rare for apple


plank listed as Malus sylvestris


planks listed as wild apple


bowl blanks listed as wild apple


bookmatched planks


set of planks and a closeup --- these were moistened for the pics


slab shown both dry and wet


planks that have been moistened for the pics


plank w/ wet and dry sections


slabs


turning stock


both sides of a turning block that has been moistened for the pic


turning stock


German apple plank w/ wet and dry sections


moisteded planks --- these have a "pippy" look that is unusual for apple


dry pen blanks


pen blanks --- I believe all of these have been moisted in some way, but it did not say


pen blanks that have been waxed


veneer


bookmatched veneer


bookmatched veenner listed as Malus sylvestris


curly apple


bookmatched scales of Eastern red apple


spalted turning block


bowl blanks


apple plank closeup from the BogusColorVendor which means the color is suspect





goblets


a bowl made from spalted apple


bowl and vase listed as spalted apple (this is white rot but that is a common form of spalting in apple)


bowls


two views of an apple bowl --- both levels of enlargement are present


apple bowl shot at a woodworking show. HUGE enlargements are present. The finish is shellac and polyurethane.


bowl listed as crab apple


various types of apple (mostly Japanese crabapple, but see pics for details) bowls turned and photographed by Tom Pleatman, whom I thank for these pics and other contributions to the site.


spalted apple bowls


shallow bowl, turned from an apple crotch, shot at a woodworking show. HUGE enlargements are present. The finish is buffed wax over polyurethane.


bowl listed as crabapple --- the owner, tongue in cheek, listed this a "South American" crabapple but not because of the origin of the wood --- look at the "map" of South America in the upper area of this pic.


platter


front and rear of a bandsaw box


mushroom


table --- this looks to be a very nice slab of apple, but at $750 I think this was overpriced.


dresser