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PANGA PANGA

Millettia stuhlmannii

Millettia stuhlmannii of the family Fabaceae (syn Leguminosae) the legume, pea, or bean family

Panga panga, which is an African wood, is often sold in the US as partridgewood, but that name is more appropriately applied to a South American wood, Andira inermis. Previously I had listed all of the woods on this page as partridgewood, but I have come to understand my error, which I believe arose partly because partridgewood IS another common name for Millettia stuhlmannii but to avoid confusion, knowledgeable vendors reprsent Millettia stuhlmannii as panga panga and use partridgewood for Andira inermis.

Early on in the existance of this site, I had never knowingly seen this wood but when Keith Weaver very kindly send along a sample, he also suggested, I belived correctly, that a wood I had posted as mystery wood 109 was panga panga (which he and I were both calling partridgewood at the time). I have more recently purchased quite a few planks of panga panga (most of which were sold to me as partridgewood / Millettia stuhlmannii) so now have many good pics of it.

There is an obvious similarity of appearance between wenge and panga panga, and I have created a small page to discuss the differences, to the extent that one can see diferences. It is here: wenge vs panga panga



my samples:


both sides and end grain of the piece Keith contributed. You can't tell it at all from these pics, but the surface in the 2nd pic has been sanded with 100-grit on the left side and fine-sanded with 220 grit on the right side. In reality, the right side shows up as clearly darker and shinier than the left side --- this is a dense wood and takes a high natural gloss when fine sanded. You can kind of get a hint of this by virtue of the flashbulb reflection cutting off abruptly in the middle where the sanding changes. Both levels of enlargement are given. In the pic directly below, I put the camera at an angle and you can see just a little better what I'm talking about.


angled shot showing the two sides with different levels of sanding


end grain closeups of both ends of the plank directly above --- color is slightly too dark


a face grain closeup of the piece directly above, in an area that emphasizes the similarity to wenge --- note, however, that a similarly figured area of a wenge plank would likely be 3 to 5 times bigger than this. This wood has a SIMILAR grain to wenge, but much tighter.


two edge grain closeups of the piece direclty above

Ross Ward, who also sent along a pic of a table he built from the wood (see below) generously donated these samples, and he did have the name as panga pange. Thanks Ross.


Both sides of a small end-grain section cut from a plank. If you compare this to the web pic of end grain on the wenge site, you'll see a very close similarity. Both of these pics have faint red tinge in them that is not in the wood --- see the closeup below for a more correct color.


closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of panga panga / Milletia stuhlmannii --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The labeled side is raw and thus has a slightly fuzzy look but the 2nd side is sanded down to 240 grit and is thus darker and shows the face grain details better.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of panga panga / Milletia stuhlmannii --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above

All of the following pics are of the same piece and all have both levels of enlargement so you can REALLY see the grain pattern up close


a flat cut side and the same side moistened (but shown inverted relative to the dry shot)


a quartersawn side and the same side moistened (but shown inverted relative to the dry shot)


the other flat cut side


end grain and a moistened pic in the same orientation


end closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


face grain and side grain enlargements of the piece directly above


both sides and end grain of what I used to have posted as mystery wood 109 --- both levels of enlargement are given.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


two planks and a small cutoff secton of another one. The upper plank is rift cut and the lower one is flat cut. The first pic shows the freshly sanded face of each and the second pic shows the side with an untouched patina (except for the small strip on the bottom which I did not turn over for the 2nd pic). If you click on each and then put the two pages side by side, you'll see that there is a substantial lightening of the color when the sanding takes off the patina.


end grain of the two planks


end grain closeups of the two planks directly above


a set of planks with patina --- color is too light; the actual wood is definitely darker, like the planks in the first set of pics above (the ones with two planks and a strip).


plank --- color correction removed just a shade too much of the red tint that is actually present in the wood.


plank and closeup


4 planks; the two upper are noticibly lighter in color and also noticibly lighter in weight than the two lower.


3 planks --- the middle one is like the lower 2 in the pic directly above and the two on each side of it are like the upper two in the pic directly above.


plank


plank and end grain --- notice how much darker this piece is than the one below; both are shown with accurate color. This piece is also noticibly heavier than the one below.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


plank and end grain --- the much lighter color of this piece is entirely accurate


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


three planks, all flat cut


four planks, with the upper two being of the somewhat heavier and darker variety


4 planks


plank


plank and end grain --- the side grain is showing, not the face grain. See below. Although there is a dark patina on the face grain of piece, it is otherwise so light in color that I was sure at first that it was not panga panga, but a close examination of the grain (especially the end grain) convinced me that it is (and the vendor who sold it to me is quite reliable, although he did have this listed as partridgewood).


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


face grain and face grain closeup of the same piece as above



web pics:


planks


both sides of a slab --- I believe these pics were sent to me in an email but I have lost all track of it.


plank listed as partridgewood, but which I'm sure is Millettia stuhlmannii, not Andira inermis, and which appears to have been bleached.


several planks from the vendor from whom I have bought most of my "type 2" and "type 3" panga panga (which he sells as partridgewood)


turning sticks


scales


pen blanks


knife handle




a table made by Ross Ward, who uses the correct name (panga panga) for the wood despite my trying, incorrectly, to convince him it should be called partridgewood.


the apparent dark streak on the left side is an effect of the REST of the table having gotten extra light reflected off of a glass picture frame on the wall next to the table. I assume that the darker color of the table (relative to the samples Ross sent) is due to a finishing agent, although it could be due to the distance of the camera and Ross's not having done color correction. The table is about 10" wide and 22" long


two sections of panga panga, on either side of a piece of padauk, on a laminated bowl. The grain hardly shows up, even on the pic on the left which is fresh off the lathe and particularly not in the pic on the right which is after a coat of natural stain. Both levels of enlargement are available and the grain can be seen pretty clearly in the 2nd enlargement, particularly in the left-hand pic. The base of the bowl is walnut