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JEQUITIBA

Cariniana spp.

Cariniana spp. of the family Lecythidaceae (which I have also seen listed as Lasiocampoidea), including at least the following: C. decandra, C. domesticata, C. estrellensis, C. ianeirensis, C. integrifolia, C. kuhlmannii, C. legalis, C. pachyantha, C. parvifolia, C. pauciramosa, C. penduliflora, C. pyriformis, C. rubra, and C. uaupensis

This South American wood is also called jequitiba rosa (which may be limited to a given species within the genera) and abarco, and the lumber is often sold under the common name cachimbo (which is also the Portugese word for pipe, which makes it damned tedious to look up this as a wood name on the internet --- you get far more hits for smoking pipes).

I have only seen the veneer on this one. I have bought veneer purported to be both jequitaba and jequitaba rosa, but cannot tell the difference, if there is any. The veneer is light and soft, with a smooth texture but a grainy look.



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of jequitiba / Cariniana spp.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of cachimbo / Cariniana domesticata --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of jequitiba / Cariniana spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of jequitiba / Cariniana spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. I have no idea if the orange part on one surface is heartwood, sapwood, water stain, or what-the-heck but I'm GUESSING that it is some kind of stain, not normal wood color, since I have not encountered this on any other pieces of pics that I have seen of this wood.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


flat cut veneer


veneer from different lots to show color variation



web pics:


plank


planks from the same vendor, flat cut and quartersawn, listed with the common name cachimbo


flooring, plank, and end grain, all listed as cachimbo with the species designated as Cariniana decandra


plank listed as cachimbo


quartersawn planks listed as Cariniana pyriformis and with the common name abarco


quartersawn plank listed as jequitiba / Cariniana brasiliensis, and NOTE: this is the same image as one of those directly above listed as Cariniana pyriformis --- this is just another example of how web sites steal pics from each other and then label them whatever they want. I have no idea which, if either, of the designations is correct.


plank listed as cachimbo rojo (which, presumably, corresponds to jequitiba rosa)


the web-pics of the lot from which my first sample at the top of the page came --- as always, the vendor who sold me this lot adds a shine to the images that is not present in the wood itself.


flat cut veneer (grain shows much better in the enlargements)


veneer listed as jequitiba rosa --- I have not yet explored whether or not that's just a variant common name, or if perhaps it's a different species. I bought at least one lot that these pics were taken from and it was indistinguishable from "normal" jequitiba which I had purchased from a diffrent vendor. It had none of the strong orange you see here but was the light-chocolate color correctly shown in my own samples up above.


veneer listed as jequitiba rosa / Cariniana brasiliensis; the first piece is flat cut and the second is quartersawn



plank, bowl blanks, and pen blanks, all listed as cachimbo but with the botanical name of Carinana domesticata, which I do not believe to be a valid botanical name)