open main page here



GUAYACAN

Caesalpinia paraguariensis


Caesalpinia paraguariensis of the family Fabaceae (syn Leguminosae) the legume, pea, or bean family

NOTE: the name guayacan / guyacan is used for over 70 species from at least 30 genera, but in the USA it USUALLY means Caesalpinia paraguariensis and is actually listed most often with the common name Argentine brown ebony or (less often) Argentine ebony or brown ebony, rather than, or in addition to, guayacan. It is my intent that this page be for that wood, but I may put in other species of "guayacan" if I run across them.

my samples:
NOTE: these pics were all taken in very bright incandescent lighting ("soft white" at 2700K)
colors will vary under other lighting conditions

None yet

web pics:


planks listed as Argentine brown ebony / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


plank listed as guayacan / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


planks listed as just guayacan and with a very unlikely color


planks listed as brown ebony


plank listed as Argentine brown ebony


turning stock listed as Argentine brown ebony / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


waxed turning stock listed as Argentine brown ebony / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


pen blanks listed as Argentine brown ebony / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


bowl blanks listed as Argentine brown ebony / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


bowl blank listed as brown ebony


flooring listed as guayacan / Caesalpinia paraguariensis


plank listed as guayacan / Minquartia quianensis


knife handle listed as guayacan


bowl by Bryan Nelson (NelsonWood). Bryan fine-polishes his bowls with 1200 or even higher grit sandpaper while they are spinning at high speed on the lathe and then finishes them there with a friction polish of his own devising, thus achieving a shine and color vibrancy that is beautiful to behold. Really big enlargements are present.


bowl --- I assume the green color of the sapwood is poor photography, not an actual wood color.


pen turned from guayacan / Caesalpinia paraguariensis. Photograph contributed to the site by the pen turner, Bruce Selyem, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The pen is finished with shellwax. Clearly this is half heartwood, half sapwood.